Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Chinese / Cantonese Chow Mein Recipe
    Lost? Site Map

    Cantonese Chow Mein

    Cantonese Chow Mein. Photo by Chef #1800261863

    1/1 Photo of Cantonese Chow Mein

    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    1 hrs 10 mins

    40 mins

    30 mins

    SpiceBunny's Note:

    A Cantonese chef -- my roommate-- gave me this recipe that I translated into English. It's pan-fried egg noodles (crispy brown in places) topped with a mix of vegetables and seafood in a light white sauce. Very nice.

    • Save to Recipe Box

    • Add to Grocery List

    • Print

    • Email

    My Private Note

    Ingredients:

    Servings:

    Units: US | Metric

    Flavouring mix

    Meat ingredients

    Vegetables

    All other ingredients

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Immerse egg noodles into boiling water for 30 seconds, then remove and set aside.
    2. 2
      Heat your wok at high heat, keep it dry. Add 5 tbsp oil and coat the wok evenly with oil.
    3. 3
      Fry the noodles for about 2 minutes, and keep shaking it back and forth, until the noodles turn golden brown. Flip and repeat.
    4. 4
      The outer noodles should be golden, inner ones are soft. Remove noodles and arrange in center of a plate.
    5. 5
      Blanch the vegetables in boiling water (30 seconds). You can arrange the bok choy in a circle around the noodles if you like.
    6. 6
      Put some oil and fry minced garlic in the work, then add the blanched vegetables and stir fry. Add the meat ingredients, 1 tbsp water, cover the wok and steam for 1 - 2 minutes.
    7. 7
      Add the flavouring ingredients, the water with corn starch, and fry gently. Add a bit more water if you want more sauce.
    8. 8
      Pour the veggies and meat over the noodles.
    9. 9
      Note #1: Char xiu (Honey BBQ pork) is available in Chinatown or a good Chinese grocery store, as well as baby boy choy (also known as Shanghai bok choy).
    10. 10
      Note #2: Ideally you should use a large non-stick wok for frying noodles. Traditionally, Chinese people use a carbon steel wok, which is baked in the oven after purchase, and then rubbed with oil after washing each time to protect it. It turns black over time, and is pretty much non-stick. You could also use a non-stick pan, but non-stick coatings are poisonous and will accumulate in your body. Non-stick pans should generally be only used with medium or low heat. If you like them, get a professional grade non-stick pan for high heat cooking, it feels like ceramic.
    11. 11
      Note #3: I often add a dash of rice wine (sake) to the meat and vegetables. It just gives it a little extra flavour and isn't salty like most cooking wines.

    Browse Our Top Vegetable Recipes

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on January 23, 2012

      55

      We really enjoyed this. The sauce and noodles are what makes this great. I cheated and used a bag of frozen Asian style vegetables (broccoli, carrots, baby corn, etc), and chicken. I look forward to making it again with fresh vegetables and with the pork and shrimp. For the sauce I substituted 1 teaspoon of chicken base instead of the bouillion, and skipped the salt. Also took the suggestion and added a splash of rice wine when cooking the meat, and added an extra 1/4 cup water to the sauce.

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on September 23, 2011

      This was beyond wonderful. Far better than any takeout I have ever had from anywhere.The sorry excuse for a local Chinese takeout has reason to be very afraid indeed ; ) I omitted the salt altogether, upped the oyster sauce by an extra 1/2 tsp, did emply the the rice wine, and added in bean sprouts to compensate for my lack of cauliflower. I had to use up leftover roast beef and half a bag of thawed tiger shrimp so subbed those for the meats listed. Served topped with chopped scallions and sesame seed.

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on January 29, 2009

      55

      Loved this dish. I used Chinese BBQ Pork with Garlic Sauce for the Chinese bbq pork, chicken breast and cooked shrimp. I couldn't get baby bok choy so used regular. Made with Soba noodles and then fried as directed. It has great flavor and looks wonderful on the plate. Took some time but was worth it. Do try this one.

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

    Read All Reviews (12)

    Advertisement

    Nutritional Facts for Cantonese Chow Mein

    Serving Size: 1 (292 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 4

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 466.9
     
    Calories from Fat 288
    61%
    Total Fat 32.0 g
    49%
    Saturated Fat 7.0 g
    35%
    Cholesterol 84.9 mg
    28%
    Sodium 908.2 mg
    37%
    Total Carbohydrate 14.6 g
    4%
    Dietary Fiber 1.9 g
    7%
    Sugars 4.1 g
    16%
    Protein 30.6 g
    61%

    The following items or measurements are not included:

    shrimp

    shiitake mushrooms

    fresh egg noodles

    Ideas from Food.com

    Advertisement


    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites